Monthly Archives: February 2011

The (B)yond Side // Leon Ware – Why i came to California

Here is another stone groove from my man Leon Ware. This is  a KON Remix (Kon & Amir the Kings of Diggin’)  of  Thats Why
I Came To Cailifornia. Its an instrumental version thats skate party worthy. ENJOY IT!

Leon-Ware—Why-I-Came-To-California-_Kon

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Artistic Dirtnap // Vik Muniz

Muniz began his career as a sculptor in the late 1980s after relocating from Brazil to Chicago and later to New York. His early work grew out of a post-Fluxus aesthetic and often involved visual puns and jokes. His most famous work from this period is “Clown Skull”, a human skull augmented w/ a clown-nose shaped protuberance.

Muniz’s work begins to take on its mature form with The Best of Life (1990) where he drew pictures of photographs included in the coffee table book “The Best of Life” from memory after losing the book in a move. The drawings were subsequently photographed and shown as photographs, a practice that Muniz continues.

Muniz followed “The Best of Life” with Equivalents (1993), Pictures of Wire (1994), and Pictures of Thread (1995) in which he developed the other aspect of his characteristic style by making the drawings out of readily recognizable non-art materials (i.e. cotton, wire, or thread). This process of making a drawing out of a nontraditional material and then photographing it has been central to Muniz’s work ever since. In 1996 he made “Sugar Children” for which he received critical acclaim. The New York Times reviewed the show and Muniz was invited to participate in the 1997-1998 New Photography exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Here are some samples of his work

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The Opposite of Weak // DANNY BROWN!!

If you don’t know about this dude you better come on in! Danny Brown is killing the underground straight from my hometown. DETROIT! Punchlines, lyrical content, comedy, cadence, what more can you say. Check it here.

Get on the mixtape here!

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Don’t Call it Hyphy // Main Attrakionz – Shining Everytime

Got hip to these dudes from the MONSTER Danny Brown. Bay Area rap duo Main Attrakionz got a hometown vibe thats unmatched. I love to hear music that sounds organic. Ever heard the term “this sounds local” well thats exactly what i like about it. It sounds basement, true underground!! Take advantage!

If you dig this, Check out more HERE

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Stalley – Slapp

An Ode to the MIDWEST. Keep doing what you doing Stalley!

Get on that Lincoln Way Nights TODAY!

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Artistic Dirtnap: Shigeo Fukuda 1932-2009

Shigeo Fukuda (February 4, 1932 – January 11, 2009) was a sculptor, graphic designer and poster designer  who created optical illusions. His art pieces usually portray deception, such as Lunch With a Helmet On, a sculpture created entirely from forks, knives, and spoons, that casts a detailed shadow of a motorcycle.

Fukuda was born on February 14, 1932 in Tokyo to a family that was involved in manufacturing toys. After the end of World War II, he became interested in the minimalist Swiss style of graphic design, and graduated from Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music in 1956.

The New York Times described how Fukuda’s posters “distilled complex concepts into compelling images of logo-simplicity”. His commercial work included his creation of the official poster for the 1970 World’s Fair in Osaka Japan . A 1980 poster created for Amnesty International features a clenched fist interwoven with barbed wire, with the letter “S” in the word “Amnesty” at the top of the poster formed from a linked shackle. “Victory 1945”, one of his best-known works, features a projectile heading straight at the opening of the barrel of a cannon. A pair of posters created to celebrate Earth Day include a design showing the Earth as a seed opening against a solid sea-blue background and “1982 Happy Earth Day”, which shows an axe with its head against the ground and a small branch sprouting upwards from its handle.

In 1987, Fukuda was inducted into the Art Directors Club Hall of Fame in NYC, which described him as “Japan’s consummate visual communicator”, making him the first Japanese designer chosen for this recognition. The Art Directors Club noted the “bitingly satirical commentary on the senselessness of war” shown in “Victory 1945”, which won him the grand prize at the 1975 Warsaw Poster Contest, a competition whose proceeds went to the Peace Fund Movement.

His home outside Tokyo featured a 4-foot-high front door that would appear far away from someone approaching the house. This door was a visual trick, with the actual entrance to the house being an unornamented white door designed to blend in seamlessly with the walls of the house.

Fukuda died January 11, 2009, after suffering a subarachnoid hemorrhage.

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